Overdue Plane Pr0n

WE’VE WAITED FOR AT LEAST 60 YEARS TO SEE THESE VIDEOS. THAT’S LONG ENOUGH!

A couple of great videos at the above link!

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14 February 1979 – This Day in Aviation

This is a rather unique story from my point of view. I have been thinking about getting a glider pilot ticket as there are fields in the area that have glider operations, including California City Municipal Airport.

I had never heard of this lady at all. She was an accomplished individual for sure. I thought it was worth a post here. I hope all enjoy it.

The full story is at the link.

 

Grob G102 Astir CS N75SW at Black Forest Gliderport, near Colorado Springs, Colorado. The mountain at the upper right of the image Pikes Peak. (Jim Freeman via “Abandoned & Little Known Airfields”)

14 February 1979: Flying her Grob G102 Astir CS glider from the Black Forest Gliderport, north of Colorado Springs, Colorado, Sabrina Patricia Jackintell soared to an altitude of 12,637 meters (41,460 feet) over Pikes Peak, setting a Fédération Aéronautique Internationale (FAI) World Record and Soaring Society of America National Record for Absolute Altitude.¹ This record still … Continue reading 14 February 1979 →

Source: 14 February 1979 – This Day in Aviation

3 December 1945 – This Day in Aviation

3 December 1945: The first landing and takeoff aboard an aircraft carrier by a jet-powered aircraft were made by Lieutenant-Commander Eric Melrose Brown, MBE, DSC, RNVR, Chief Naval Test Pilot at RAE Farnborough, while flying a de Havilland DH.100 Sea Vampire Mk.10, LZ551/G. The ship was the Royal Navy Colossus-class light aircraft carrier, HMS Ocean … Continue reading 3 December 1945 →

Source: 3 December 1945 – This Day in Aviation

RARE PHOTOS: ANNIVERSARY OF THE BOEING 727’S FIRST FLIGHT

Today is the 53rd anniversary of the Boeing 727’s first flight. What a day. At the time, the 727 was a risk and important to the success of Boeing. Luckily for everyone, not only was the first flight a huge success, but the aircraft would go on to help redefine domestic air travel.

My first ride in a jet airliner was in a 727 of Northwest Orient. My Mom, two younger sisters and I rode in one from Billings MT to New York JFK with a stop in Minneapolis-Saint Paul in February of 1968. We were on our way to Germany to join Dad where he was working for an Air Force Contractor.

The meal service was really good and we could get a Coke or othere soft drink by just letting the stewardess know.

The Boeing 727's first flight - Photo: Boeing

Air-to-air photo of the Boeing 727’s first flight – Photo: Boeing

More pics and the full story at the link below.

Rare Photos: Anniversary of the Boeing 727’s First Flight

Hawker Hurricane: Gratuitous Plane Pr0n

I came across this website http://www.aviation-history.com/index.html

It has short narratives on a myriad of aircraft and I was definitely interested.

First Up: Hawker Hurricane, which was instrumental in the RAF winning the Battle of Britain.

I figured it may be of interest to some…………………….so here it goes……….

Often underrated, the Hurricane shouldered the lion’s share of Britain’s defense during the ” Battle of Britain”. It was the first fighter monoplane to join the Royal Air Force and the first combat aircraft adopted by that arm capable of exceeding 300 mph in level flight.

“The early history of the Hurricane is an interesting parallel in many ways with that of theSupermarine Spitfire in with which it was to form an immortal partnership. While the Spitfire was an entirely new concept based on specialized experience, the Hurricane was the logical outcome of a long line of fighting aircraft. Although the two airplanes broadly met the same requirements, they represented entirely different approaches to the same problem. The two approaches were reflected to an interesting degree in their respective appearances; the Hurricane workmanlike, rugged and sturdy, the Spitfire slender and ballerina-like. One was the studied application of experience, the other a stroke of genius.”

The rest of the piece is at the following link. Please read and enjoy.

http://www.aviation-history.com/hawker/hurrcane.html