Remembrance Day

The text was posted at Facebook by my friend Scott Ruch along with the picture.

Today, however you chose to call it, Armistice Day, Rembrance Day or Veteran’s Day, is a difficult one for myself and my family. On this day 27 years ago, we lost my Dad to cancer. As an Airman and then Soldier, I suppose it was most appropriate.

“They shall grow not old, as we that are left grow old: Age shall not weary them, nor the years condemn. At the going down of the sun and in the morning, We will remember them.”

Dusty…

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On the passing of Captain McCain

I have been watching the “conversations” about John McCain on The Book of Faces since the news of his passing broke in the news media and I must say the some of it upsets me.

First, yes I did vote for him in 2008. No regrets there. Good, that is out of the way.

John McCain served his country admirably and with distinction in the United States Navy. His last tour was in command of Attack Squadron One Seven Four which was one of the largest squadrons in the Navy, responsible for the training of Naval Aviators and Maintenance Personnel heading to A-7 Light Attack Squadrons in the US Atlantic Fleet. That is an awesome responsibility. Nuff said.

There are the rumors of his behaviour while he was a POW during the Vietnam Conflict. As far as I can see those are just that, rumors.

If individuals cannot show some form of decorum regarding his death, they have some serious issues as human beings from the point of view of this Old Retired Petty Officer. At this point, the man’s political views are a moot point. Dignity and respect should be given to his family in the manner of one’s chosen beliefs and values. I have seen comments from a few Christians that are quite frankly reprehensible at best. Some Christian behaviour on their part.  Cancer is a vile thing. It took my Dad and I have had it myself. When Captain McCain made the decision to stop treatment, it was a decision to be taken lightly. My Dad did the same thing.

When the funeral happens in the near future, I truly hope that all of us take the time to bow or cover our heads as whatever religious custom dictates in respect and reflection for a truly good man who gave his best to his country. Remember this one thing, their are those who truly believe that he was a hero. If you chose to believe otherwise, that is your choice. I will not criticize you in an open forum for that. My own upbringing and sense of values will not let me attack you.

The best I can do today. The afflictions of the years and mileage are having an impact on the thought process today.

Just remember this one thing. Only G-d can truly judge us.

ORPO sends.

Eddie Rickenbacker – His Life and Accomplishments

The man had a colorful growing up, to say the least!

A short biography about Captain Rickenbacker that was on my Facebook news feed this morning from Disciples of Flight.

Captain Eddie Rickenbacker Consider it luck, skill, or just plain determination: Captain Eddie Rickenbacker survived, by his own count, 135 brushes with death before finally succumbing at the respectable age of 82.  He flew numerous combat missions in World War 1 and survived multiple serious airplane crashes after the war.  Learn more about the dangerous,

Source: Eddie Rickenbacker – His Life and Accomplishments

Happy Birthday Lewis “Chesty” B. Puller (29 Photos and Story)

This was at theBrigade. I check it on Mondays. It was too good to pass up.

This has some really good pictures and narratives as well. I think all will enjoy it!

A Marine officer and enlisted man for 37 years, General Puller served at sea or overseas for all but ten of those years, including a hitch as commander of the "Horse Marines" in China. Excluding medals from foreign governments, he won a total of 14 personal decorations in combat, plus a long list of campaign medals, unit citation ribbons, and other awards. In addition to his Navy Crosses (the next-highest decoration to the Medal of Honor for Naval personnel), he holds its Army equivalent, the Distinguished Service Cross.

“A Marine officer and enlisted man for 37 years, General Puller served at sea or overseas for all but ten of those years, including a hitch as commander of the “Horse Marines” in China. Excluding medals from foreign governments, he won a total of 14 personal decorations in combat, plus a long list of campaign medals, unit citation ribbons, and other awards. In addition to his Navy Crosses (the next-highest decoration to the Medal of Honor for Naval personnel), he holds its Army equivalent, the Distinguished Service Cross.”

10 Deadliest Snipers in History. #1 Gives Me Chills.

My friend Esther Ziegler Burns had this at Facebook.

“Extreme marksmanship has been a part of war ever since firearms became the tools of choice. There are just some people who can do things with a rifle that others cannot.

The following list contains what we believe to be the 10 deadliest snipers of all time. The list may not be ordered based on the number of confirmed kills or the longest shots made, but by taking into account an entire career.”

sniper1

10 Deadliest Snipers in History. #1 Gives Me Chills..

Christmas Weekend on California’s Central Coast

The VQ at Vandenberg was our headquarters.

The Monarch Butterfly Grove is an obligatory stop during the time the Butterflies are here.

The Ocean was making just enough noise as well…………………………………….I think of my departed friends, Lex, Buck and Lionel when I see the sunset from Oceano Beach south of Pismo.

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Lex, Buck and Lionel……………………..Yeah……………..that’s them………………..Dusty in here
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Butterflies………………………Lots of Butterflies
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We love Pismo Beach!

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The next four are some Oceano Beach Rule Five……………

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From Townhall: And Touched The Face Of God

This piece was at Townhall and a friend of mine had it on his Facebook. It will make your eyes water a bit, trust me on that one.

“Shortly after the infamous attack on Pearl Harbor, pilot-poet James Gillespie Magee died. You may remember him via something he wrote:

“Oh! I have slipped the surly bonds of earth And danced the skies on laughter-silvered wings; Sunward I’ve climbed, and joined the tumbling mirth of sun-split clouds—and done a hundred things you have not dreamed of—wheeled and soared and swung high in the sunlit silence.””

“A few years ago, in the ICU of Houston’s Kindred Hospital, another snatch of sorts took place as a hero of a time long past, one who served our nation as a glider pilot during those brief and storied days, was “snatched” from his bed of affliction in a twinkling of an eye. He then soared at breakneck speed to the heavens, never to collide with this world again. His name was Curtis Goldman – those of us who knew him and counted him as a friend called him, affectionately, “Goldie.” He was 86 years old”

Glider Pilot. Awesome man, indeed.

http://townhall.com/columnists/davidstokes/2014/05/26/and-touched-the-face-of-god-n1843174