In Memoriam of Apollo 1

I believe it was yesterday that marked the 50th anniversary of the tragedy of Apollo 1 that took the lives of Gus Grissom, Ed White and Roger Chaffee. It is still vivid in my mind.

An old shipmate of mine from days in the Argonauts of Attack Squadron 147 now works at NASA at Cape Canaveral. He was kind enough to send me some pictures of the launch pad from that day that is now abandoned in place.

Without further ado, here they are.

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10 Ancient Warriors who were certified badasses (10 Photos)

Germanicus

During the height of the Roman Empire, Germanicus was universally recognized by soldiers, citizens and politicians alike to be the single most ferocious, merciless yet honorable warrior ever to be produced by Rome. Despite being born into the elite, Germanicus spent most of his life knee-deep in dead enemies on the battlefield, writing poetry about astrology and most notably - extracting brutal revenge on Germans. 

You see, after hearing about the Romans suffering a humiliating defeat at the hands of the German Tribal Chief Arminius, Germanicus spent several years seething in quiet rage and plotting retribution. He had three goals in mind - First, to find the site where they suffered defeat and bury the bodies of fallen Romans. Second, to recover the captured Eagles the Germanic Tribes took and bring them back to Rome. Lastly, to turn into a limb-severing machine and take the lives of as many enemies as possible. He succeeded in prolific fashion in all endeavors and returned home a paragon of loyalty, the ultimate symbol of an honorable warrior, and the one guy you shouldn't piss off.

Germanicus

During the height of the Roman Empire, Germanicus was universally recognized by soldiers, citizens and politicians alike to be the single most ferocious, merciless yet honorable warrior ever to be produced by Rome. Despite being born into the elite, Germanicus spent most of his life knee-deep in dead enemies on the battlefield, writing poetry about astrology and most notably – extracting brutal revenge on Germans.

You see, after hearing about the Romans suffering a humiliating defeat at the hands of the German Tribal Chief Arminius, Germanicus spent several years seething in quiet rage and plotting retribution. He had three goals in mind – First, to find the site where they suffered defeat and bury the bodies of fallen Romans. Second, to recover the captured Eagles the Germanic Tribes took and bring them back to Rome. Lastly, to turn into a limb-severing machine and take the lives of as many enemies as possible. He succeeded in prolific fashion in all endeavors and returned home a paragon of loyalty, the ultimate symbol of an honorable warrior, and the one guy you shouldn’t piss off.

I have heard of Germanicus the most………………………

10 Ancient Warriors who were certified badasses (10 Photos)

Shakespeare died 400 years ago today — here are 21 everyday phrases he coined

I found this courtesy of Joy McCann from Business Insider. I never new a lot of these and I was reared in an academic household. Go Figure, Eh?

Shakespeare died 400 years ago today — here are 21 everyday phrases he coined

William Shakespeare wrote a lot of great plays, but he also coined and popularized a lot of words and phrases that we still use to this day.

 

“Puking”
“Puking”
Wikimedia
“The Seven Ages of Man: The Infant” by Robert Smirke, derived from a monologue in Shakespeare’s “As You Like It.”
“All the world’s a stage,
And all the men and women merely players:
They have their exits and their entrances;
And one man in his time plays many parts,
His acts being seven ages. At first the infant,
Mewling and puking in the nurse’s arms. …”

How Shakespeare uses it: “Puking” was first recorded in Shakespeare’s “As You Like It.” It was likely an English imitation of the German word “spucken,” which means to spit, according to Dictionary.com.

Modern definition: A synonym for the verb “to vomit.”

Source: “As You Like It,” Act 2, Scene 7

“Vanish into thin air”
“Vanish into thin air”
Wikimedia
Constantin Stanislavski as Othello.
“Then put up your pipes in your bag, for I’ll away. Go; vanish into air; away!” (Othello)

How Shakespeare uses it: The Clown says this to the musicians in “Othello” to make them go away.

But some have also suggested that there is a darker underlying meaning. Act 3 in Othello is the final act that suggests that all of this might have a happy ending. It gets pretty dark starting in Act 4. So the Clown might be symbolically asking musicians and all happy things to “vanish into thin air” because there’s no more room for them in the play.

A similar phrase is also found in “The Tempest.”

Modern definition: To disappear without a trace.

Sources: “Othello,” Act 3, Scene 1, “The Tempest,” Act 4, Scene 1
“There’s a method to my madness”
“There’s a method to my madness”
Wikimedia
Polonius from “Hamlet.”
“Though this be madness, yet there is method in ‘t. Will you walk out of the air, my lord?”

How Shakespeare uses it: Polonius says it in “Hamlet,” basically suggesting that there is reason behind apparent chaos.

Modern definition: The meaning is the same nowadays, although the language is a bit updated into modern terms. It is also a Bee Gees song.

Source: “Hamlet,” Act 2, Scene 2

“Wild-goose chase”
“Wild-goose chase”
Wikimedia
“Nay, if they wits run the wild-goose chase, I have
done, for thou hast more of the wild-goose in one of
thy wits than, I am sure, I have in my whole five:
was I with you there for the goose?”

How Shakespeare uses it: Mercutio says that he can’t keep up with Romeo’s jokes and puns. Romeo tells him to continue, but Mercutio sees the endeavor as a “wild goose chase.”

A wild-goose chase was reportedly a real game back in 16th-century England in which “a horseman executed a series of difficult maneuvers which others had to repeat in close succession.”

Modern definition: A senseless — and probably hopeless — pursuit of an object or an end.

Source: “Romeo and Juliet,” Act 2, Scene 4
“The green eyed-monster”
“The green eyed-monster”
Wikimedia
Othello and Iago.
“Oh, beware, my lord, of jealousy!
It is the green-eyed monster which doth mock
The meat it feeds on.”

How Shakespeare uses it: Iago says this phrase as he plants doubts in Othello’s mind about his wife’s faithfulness. Merriam-Webster writes that he may have been evoking cats, given that they are “green-eyed creatures who toy with their prey before killing it.”

Modern definition: Now “the green eyed-monster” is an idiomatic expression for the noun “jealousy.”

Source: “Othello,” Act 3, Scene 3

“Break the ice”
“Break the ice”
Wikimedia
Katherina and Petruchio.
“… And if you break the ice and do this feat,
Achieve the elder, set the younger free
For our access, whose hap shall be to have her
Will not so graceless be to be ingrate.”

How Shakespeare uses it: Tranio suggests if Petruchio can “break the ice,” then he will be able to woo Katherina. By using the “ice” language, Shakespeare makes Katherina seem as cold as ice. Moreover, the fact that the ice needs to be broken suggests that she is hard to reach.

But the first actual usage of “break the ice” probably comes from Sir Thomas North’s 1579 translation of “Plutarch’s Lives of the Noble Grecians and Romans” — although in this case the phrase meant “to forge a path for others to follow,” alluding to the breaking of ice to allow the navigation of boats.

Modern definition: “Break the ice” still means to get to know someone.

Source: “The Taming of the Shrew,” Act 1, Scene 2
“Wear my heart upon my sleeve”
“Wear my heart upon my sleeve”
Wikimedia
Iago not rocking a heart on his sleeve.
“For when my outward action doth demonstrate
The native act and figure of my heart
In compliment extern, ’tis not long after
But I will wear my heart upon my sleeve
For daws to peck at: I am not what I am.”

How Shakespeare uses it: Devious Iago basically says that if his outward appearance reflected what he was thinking, then his heart would be on his sleeve for birds to peck at — which is not a good idea in his eyes. And so he adds that he is actually not what he appears to be.

Notably, Iago’s motives for his antagonistic behavior are never fully revealed — so it is interesting that he is the character who has immortalized this phrase.

Modern definition: To show one’s feelings openly.

Source: “Othello,” Act 1, Scene 1

“Swagger”
“Swagger”
Wikimedia
Oberon, Titania, and Puck with dancing fairies.
“What hempen home-spuns have we swaggering here,
So near the cradle of the fairy queen?
What, a play toward! I’ll be the auditor;
An actor too, perhaps, if I see cause.”

How Shakespeare uses it: Puck, a mischievous sprite, uses the term “swagger” to mean “insolent.” It might have been a frequentative form of “swag,” which means “to sway.”

The word is also found in “Henry IV: Part 2” where Mistress Quickly gives a speech about super-aggressive men who visit her tavern, where the meaning of swagger suggests the meaning of boasting or bragging.

Additionally, the term is also found in “King Lear,” where it most closely means “blustering.” Although, here it is spelled “zwaggered.”

Modern definition: Jay Z used “swagger” and “swag” in several songs back in the early 2000s. Soulja Boy also used the word — “she likes my swag.” Since then, it has been often used in modern song lyrics.

Sources: “A Midsummer Night’s Dream,” Act 3, Scene 1, “Henry IV: Part 2,” Act 2, Scene 4, “King Lear, Act 4, Scene 6
“All of a sudden”
“All of a sudden”
Wikimedia
Katherina in “The Taming of the Shrew.”
“I pray, sir, tell me, is it possible
That love should of a sodaine take such hold?”

How Shakespeare uses it: Apparently, Shakespeare might have thought that “all of a sudden” was a more poetic way of saying “suddenly” so he had the character Tranio in “The Taming of the Shrew” say it that way.

Although, Shakespeare wasn’t the first to use “sudden” — John Greenwood used it in 1590.

Modern definition: The meaning is the same, although we now spell it “sudden” rather than “sodaine.” The word is spelled in the modern way in newer printings of “The Taming of the Shrew.”

Source: “The Taming of the Shrew,” Act 1, Scene 1

“A heart of gold”
“A heart of gold”
Wikimedia
Lewis Waller as Henry V.
“The king’s a bawcock, and a heart of gold,
A lad of life, an imp of fame;
Of parents good, of fist most valiant. …”

How Shakespeare uses it: King Henry disguises himself as a commoner in the play and asks Pistol, who is unaware of the disguise, whether he considers himself to be better than the king. Pistol responds with the above quote.

Modern definition: To be extremely kind and helpful.

Source: “Henry V,” Act 4, Scene 1
“One fell swoop”
“One fell swoop”
Wikimedia
Macduff.
“He has no children. All my pretty ones?
Did you say all? O hell-kite! All?
What, all my pretty chickens and their dam
At one fell swoop?”

How Shakespeare uses it: Macduff says this after finding out that his family and servants have been killed. Shakespeare’s use of the hunting bird’s’ “fell swoop” imagery reflects the ruthlessness and deadliness of the attack.

Modern definition: In one, sudden act.

Source: “Macbeth, Act 4, Scene 3

“Devil incarnate”
“Devil incarnate”
Wikimedia
“O worthy Goth, this is the incarnate devil
That robb’d Andronicus of his good hand.” (Titus Andronicus)

“Yes, that a’ did; and said they were devils incarnate.” (Henry V)

How Shakespeare uses it: Lucius calls Aaron the Moor the “devil incarnate” — aka a devil in the flesh — after all the suffering he causes his family. Chief among them, convincing Demtrius and Chiron to rape Lavinia and framing Martius and Quintus for the murder of Bassianus.

Shakespeare also reused the phrase about a decade later in “Henry V.”

Modern definition: The meaning of the phrase is more or less unchanged.

Sources: “Titus Andronicus,” Act V, Scene 1, “Henry V,” Act 2, Scene 3
“Stuff that dreams are made on/of”
“Stuff that dreams are made on/of”
Wikimedia
Prospero and Miranda.
“We are such stuff
As dreams are made on, and our little life
Is rounded with a sleep.”

How Shakespeare uses it: This phrase is not as cheerful as we use it today. Prospero is saying that peoples’ lives — and his magic — are like dreams: We experience them, and then they totally evaporate without leaving any lasting evidence. “Sleep” likely refers to death here.

Modern definition: Nowadays, we say “stuff that dreams are made of” rather than “on.” And it also refers to some sort of fantasy things or life that we could only dream of having.

Source: “The Tempest,” Act 4, Scene 1

“To come full circle”
“To come full circle”
Wikimedia
The wheel of fortune from Boccaccio.
“Thou hast spoken right, ’tis true;
The wheel has come full circle: I am here.”

How Shakespeare uses it: Edmund says the phrase at the end of “King Lear,” highlighting how he has “completed a cycle” where his diabolical actions have come back to haunt him.

Shakespeare was also probably referencing Fate — and the “Wheel of Fortune” — from ancient and medieval philosophy, which thus introduced the question of free will versus everything being determined by fate.

Modern definition: Completing a cycling, getting back to the beginning.

Source: “King Lear,” Act 5, Scene 3
“In my heart of heart”
“In my heart of heart”
AP
Lawrence Olivier as Hamlet
“Give me that man
That is not passion’s slave, and I will wear him
In my heart’s core, ay, in my heart of heart,
As I do thee.”

How Shakespeare uses it: While speaking with Horatio, Hamlet says this phrase noting that if there’s a man who is “not passion’s slave” — aka, a master of his emotions — then he’ll put him close to his heart. Using the language “heart’s core” right before suggests that Hamlet means some very deep, central part of his heart/emotions.

Modern definition: Nowadays, we pluralize the second “heart” to say “in my heart of hearts.” The phrase refers to one’s inner-most, secret thoughts.

Source: “Hamlet,” Act 3, Scene 2

“Too much of a good thing”
“Too much of a good thing”
Wikimedia
Rosalind dressed as a man, Ganymede.
“Why then, can one desire too much of a good thing?
Come, sister, you shall be the priest and marry us.
Give me your hand, Orlando. What do you say, sister?”

How Shakespeare uses it: This phrase may have been a proverb dating to the late 15th century, but Shakespeare was the one who has it immortalized in print.

Rosalind is pretending to be a man named Ganymede while she is with Orlando, with whom she is in love. He’s also in love with Rosalind — and doesn’t know she is Ganymede — and practices how he would woo Rosalind with Ganymede. At one point, Rosalind/Ganymede suggests that they have a pretend wedding, and asks if one can ever have too much of a good thing.

Modern definition: Too much good might backfire and be bad.

Source: “As You Like It,” Act 4, Scene 1
“All that glitters is not gold”
“All that glitters is not gold”
Wikimedia
Portia from “The Merchant of Venice.”
“All that glitters is not gold;
Often have you heard that told:
Many a man his life hath sold
But my outside to behold:
Gilded tombs do worms enfold.”

How Shakespeare uses it: Shakespeare seems to be the first person to have written this phrase, although the idea was not new.

The Prince of Morocco, one of Portia’s suitors in “The Merchant of Venice,” much choose out the correct casket to get his bride: one gold, one silver, and one lead. The gold one has an inscription on it which reads “All that glitters is not gold … gilded tombs do worms enfold.” But he picks it anyway …

Modern definition: Basically, just because it’s shiny and nice on the outside, doesn’t mean that that’s true of the inside.

Source: “The Merchant of Venice,” Act 2, Scene 7

Shakespeare died 400 years ago today — here are 21 everyday phrases he coined

 

Eddie Rickenbacker – His Life and Accomplishments

The man had a colorful growing up, to say the least!

A short biography about Captain Rickenbacker that was on my Facebook news feed this morning from Disciples of Flight.

Captain Eddie Rickenbacker Consider it luck, skill, or just plain determination: Captain Eddie Rickenbacker survived, by his own count, 135 brushes with death before finally succumbing at the respectable age of 82.  He flew numerous combat missions in World War 1 and survived multiple serious airplane crashes after the war.  Learn more about the dangerous,

Source: Eddie Rickenbacker – His Life and Accomplishments

That Time When Custer Stole a Horse | History | Smithsonian

Custer was a grandstanding scalawag……………..This is an interesting read.

I have a distant relative that was in the 7th when they were defeated at Little Bighorn. He was killed on the second day with Reno and Benteen.

The theft of a prize-winning stallion gave the famous general a glimpse of a future that could have been…………

Source: That Time When Custer Stole a Horse | History | Smithsonian

From Ancient Origins: Archaeologists Excavate Possible Home of Mary Magdalene and Synagogue Where Jesus May Have Preached

I found this site and have added it to the favourites listing. It has some really good reading on it. This one is kind of neat in that it uses the word synagogue vice temple. Seems that in the Common Era, that is a lost term. I still use it. OK, I may be getting old.(my doctor actually said this a few weeks ago.)

As a child, I was sent to Sunday School in a Congregational Church in a very small town in North Central Montana. I didn’t know I was actually Jewish until I was in the Navy……………………………………………Let me tell ya about a convoluted blood line sometime………………………

From a historical standpoint, this interests me.

 

Featured image: The Magdala Stone or altar in a temple where Jesus possibly preached (Wikimedia Commons)

The full article is at the link below. Enjoy my friends!

http://www.ancient-origins.net/history-archaeology/archaeologists-excavate-possible-home-mary-magdalene-and-synagogue-020472

When L.A. Was Empty: Wide-Open SoCal Landscapes | LA as Subject | SoCal Focus | KCET

My dear friend, Joy McCann had this on Facebook a little while ago. The pictures of Los Angeles a long time a go are quite good.

View of North Hollywood and the San Fernando Valley from the Santa Monica Mountains, 1909. Courtesy of the USC Libraries - California Historical Society Collection.
View of North Hollywood and the San Fernando Valley from the Santa Monica Mountains, 1909. Courtesy of the USC Libraries – California Historical Society Collection.

Go to the link below and have a look. I think you will enjoy it.

When L.A. Was Empty: Wide-Open SoCal Landscapes | LA as Subject | SoCal Focus | KCET.

Famous Last Words | 16 Manly Last Words | The Art of Manliness-Surfing in the wee hours found this one

This is a direct result of my new work hours…………………….I get home at 0200…………………………..I actually have this site on my favourites list……

It has some good stuff on it………………………………….

Famous Last Words | 16 Manly Last Words | The Art of Manliness.

The rusting relics of an eerie Hungarian train graveyard – The Vintage News

1414586830062_wps_77_A_four_cylinder_MAV_301_s
History: Connected to the MAV 301 series locomotive are carriages said to have been used by the Nazis to transport hundreds of thousands of Jews to their deaths at Auschwitz concentration camp

Interesting piece at The Vintage News. I visit this site from time to time as it does have some rather interesting posts.

The pictures of the graveyard are eerie to say the least, not to mention that some may have been used to pull the cars that went to the camps in WW2.

The full story is at the link below.

The rusting relics of an eerie Hungarian train graveyard – The Vintage News.

Yeah. Another one of them anniversaries………….that are getting far too regular……………..

Oh Shit, I’m getting old moment………….
40 years ago today, I finished my first deployment to the Med on Independence with the ship’s arrival at Pier 7, Naval Station Norfolk on a very cold, rainy and windy day.

I was all of 20 years old.

First Cruise

 

It seems as though anniversaries like this are hitting at a far too frequent pace…………………….

Woman Who Survived Auschwitz Concentration Camp Because Nazis Ran Out of Gas Turns 101 | Jewish & Israel News Algemeiner.com

“A Jewish woman who escaped the gas chambers of the Auschwitz concentration camp because Nazis ran out of gas is preparing to celebrate her 101st birthday on New Year’s Eve, UK’s Daily Mailreported.

Klara Markus, from Sighetu Marmaţiei in northern Romania, survived three Holocaust concentration camps before the Second World War ended. The mother-of-two was a prisoner in Dachau and Ravensbruck before being sent to Poland’s notorious Auschwitz death camp.”

I could spend a lifetime trying to explain The Holocaust……………………………………………………….

 

Woman Who Survived Auschwitz Concentration Camp Because Nazis Ran Out of Gas Turns 101 | Jewish & Israel News Algemeiner.com.

Pearl Harbor Day

The Day That Will Live In Infamy

The photos are from the Navy History Site.

I had things to do today and this is what I came up with. Humble. That’s all.

Pearlharborcolork13513
Arizona at the moment of the bomb striking. This is the definitive photo of the entire attack. May the Memory of all who rest in her be a Blessing.

1024px-USS_California_sinking-Pearl_Harbor

1024px-USS_SHAW_exploding_Pearl_Harbor_Nara_80-G-16871_2

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g32792 g40056

g387565 g387598

g464088

h50472

h50766

h50929

h50930

h50931

h50932

h50933

h57670

h83063

h83064

h83109

h97376

h97382

h97396

Pearlmap1
A diagram of the two waves in the attack.

Pictures of the Missouri moored next to the Arizona. I have been lucky to have visited the Missouri when it was at the Storage and Maintenance Facility at The Puget Sound Naval Shipyard in Bremerton in late 1979.

Arizona and Missouri

Missouri-Arizona-Memorial

A link to an article at The Daily Signal about the memorials following the attack is below. One of my Maternal Grandmother’s second cousins ran a boarding house outside the gate of Naval Station Pearl Harbor. I was told as a child that the house took some shrapnel and stray rounds as a result of strafing. I have never been able to confirm that. A guy I served with in VT-26 at NAS Chase Field in 1977-1978 told me that his father was onboard West Virginia. The Pearl Harbor attack links a lot of us in the Sea Service, it seems.

http://dailysignal.com/2014/12/07/21-photos-pearl-harbor-day-will-live-infamy/