Senior photography on train tracks – illegal & deadly – WFSB 3 Connecticut

It’s a nationwide problem that railroad companies are looking to solve, and it all starts with a camera.

LUBBOCK, TX (KCBD) –

It’s a nationwide problem that railroad companies are looking to solve, and it all starts with a camera.

Getting on the tracks is very dangerous and outright stupid.

Read more: http://www.wfsb.com/story/32000376/senior-photography-on-train-tracks-illegal-deadly#ixzz49PxGWh3O

raphy on train tracks – illegal & deadly – WFSB 3 Connecticut

Comedy Gold! Noted blogger mocksConspiracy loons Roger Stone and Alex Jones

If You're Left

Roger Stone, taking Douchebaggery to new levels

Stone1Suckers on Parade deserves an award of some kind for this!

We all realize we live in dangerous times, and we are reminded daily by the Tinfoil Hat brigades that conspiracies lurk around ever corner. And former Richard Nixon dirty trickster and super-important truth-teller Roger Stone wants America to know that he’s ready for anything Hillary Clinton is personally planning to throw at him, because this isn’t his first dance and he knows the Clinton Mafia likes to play rough.

Like that time they totally killed JFK Jr. by blowing up his plane and miraculously making the wreckage look like it hit the water intact. So it should be no surprise that Stone, in an interview Thursday with the self confessed late night cockroach assassin on Alex Jones’ Fantasy Internet Fest, warned Hillary Clinton: If she comes at the King, she’d best…

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A ‘Golden Opportunity’

Hat tip to Bob Belvedere

The Camp Of The Saints

One way to effectively battle the Despots running our governments is to refuse to go along with their un-Constitutional decrees, to not cooperate in our Enslavement by Tyrants.

In America, it is we individuals who hold the Sovereignty.  Ultimately we are the source of all Legitimate Authority.  Our governments at all levels exist to protect our Natural Rights.  In other words, the Government exists to serve us, not — and never — the other way around.  We determine the amount of Power that our governments can wield in our name.  We determine what are the limits on the Power and Control they may exercise.  We consent to their very and continued existence.

We agree, via our Constitution, to support our governments in their efforts by, among other ways, complying with the Laws they pass and even the Regulations they issue.  When we believe they have overstepped their Delegated Powers, we…

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The F-8 Crusader Once Scared a Vietnamese MiG Pilot Into Ejecting Before a Dogfight

The Tactical Air Network

Every fighter pilot out there just wants to fly an aircraft so badass that nobody dares tangle with it (or them by extension). But there’s a secret part of them that hungers for the fight that their jet was built for. Naval aviators privileged with flying the F-8 Crusader were given a fairly badass jet, albeit one with an astonishingly high mishap rate. By the end of its production, 1261 F-8s were churned off the line, and all but 155 of them were involved in some mishap or another, varying in severity. To be fair, the F-8 entered service at a time when the Navy (and Marine Corps) was still learning its way around having jets as primary air/strike fighters in place of piston-powered propeller planes. Civilian defense contractors were still in their infant stages with jet production and design, so it wouldn’t be out of place to expect that…

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Sad news today

My cousin died today from a massive heart attack. I have no other details.

My aunt lost two husbands and the younger son as well as her last relationship to cardio pulmonary issues.

The only one left is the daughter.

Richard was a retired HM2 and worked as a physical therapist.

Shakespeare died 400 years ago today — here are 21 everyday phrases he coined

I found this courtesy of Joy McCann from Business Insider. I never new a lot of these and I was reared in an academic household. Go Figure, Eh?

Shakespeare died 400 years ago today — here are 21 everyday phrases he coined

William Shakespeare wrote a lot of great plays, but he also coined and popularized a lot of words and phrases that we still use to this day.

 

“Puking”
“Puking”
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“The Seven Ages of Man: The Infant” by Robert Smirke, derived from a monologue in Shakespeare’s “As You Like It.”
“All the world’s a stage,
And all the men and women merely players:
They have their exits and their entrances;
And one man in his time plays many parts,
His acts being seven ages. At first the infant,
Mewling and puking in the nurse’s arms. …”

How Shakespeare uses it: “Puking” was first recorded in Shakespeare’s “As You Like It.” It was likely an English imitation of the German word “spucken,” which means to spit, according to Dictionary.com.

Modern definition: A synonym for the verb “to vomit.”

Source: “As You Like It,” Act 2, Scene 7

“Vanish into thin air”
“Vanish into thin air”
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Constantin Stanislavski as Othello.
“Then put up your pipes in your bag, for I’ll away. Go; vanish into air; away!” (Othello)

How Shakespeare uses it: The Clown says this to the musicians in “Othello” to make them go away.

But some have also suggested that there is a darker underlying meaning. Act 3 in Othello is the final act that suggests that all of this might have a happy ending. It gets pretty dark starting in Act 4. So the Clown might be symbolically asking musicians and all happy things to “vanish into thin air” because there’s no more room for them in the play.

A similar phrase is also found in “The Tempest.”

Modern definition: To disappear without a trace.

Sources: “Othello,” Act 3, Scene 1, “The Tempest,” Act 4, Scene 1
“There’s a method to my madness”
“There’s a method to my madness”
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Polonius from “Hamlet.”
“Though this be madness, yet there is method in ‘t. Will you walk out of the air, my lord?”

How Shakespeare uses it: Polonius says it in “Hamlet,” basically suggesting that there is reason behind apparent chaos.

Modern definition: The meaning is the same nowadays, although the language is a bit updated into modern terms. It is also a Bee Gees song.

Source: “Hamlet,” Act 2, Scene 2

“Wild-goose chase”
“Wild-goose chase”
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“Nay, if they wits run the wild-goose chase, I have
done, for thou hast more of the wild-goose in one of
thy wits than, I am sure, I have in my whole five:
was I with you there for the goose?”

How Shakespeare uses it: Mercutio says that he can’t keep up with Romeo’s jokes and puns. Romeo tells him to continue, but Mercutio sees the endeavor as a “wild goose chase.”

A wild-goose chase was reportedly a real game back in 16th-century England in which “a horseman executed a series of difficult maneuvers which others had to repeat in close succession.”

Modern definition: A senseless — and probably hopeless — pursuit of an object or an end.

Source: “Romeo and Juliet,” Act 2, Scene 4
“The green eyed-monster”
“The green eyed-monster”
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Othello and Iago.
“Oh, beware, my lord, of jealousy!
It is the green-eyed monster which doth mock
The meat it feeds on.”

How Shakespeare uses it: Iago says this phrase as he plants doubts in Othello’s mind about his wife’s faithfulness. Merriam-Webster writes that he may have been evoking cats, given that they are “green-eyed creatures who toy with their prey before killing it.”

Modern definition: Now “the green eyed-monster” is an idiomatic expression for the noun “jealousy.”

Source: “Othello,” Act 3, Scene 3

“Break the ice”
“Break the ice”
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Katherina and Petruchio.
“… And if you break the ice and do this feat,
Achieve the elder, set the younger free
For our access, whose hap shall be to have her
Will not so graceless be to be ingrate.”

How Shakespeare uses it: Tranio suggests if Petruchio can “break the ice,” then he will be able to woo Katherina. By using the “ice” language, Shakespeare makes Katherina seem as cold as ice. Moreover, the fact that the ice needs to be broken suggests that she is hard to reach.

But the first actual usage of “break the ice” probably comes from Sir Thomas North’s 1579 translation of “Plutarch’s Lives of the Noble Grecians and Romans” — although in this case the phrase meant “to forge a path for others to follow,” alluding to the breaking of ice to allow the navigation of boats.

Modern definition: “Break the ice” still means to get to know someone.

Source: “The Taming of the Shrew,” Act 1, Scene 2
“Wear my heart upon my sleeve”
“Wear my heart upon my sleeve”
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Iago not rocking a heart on his sleeve.
“For when my outward action doth demonstrate
The native act and figure of my heart
In compliment extern, ’tis not long after
But I will wear my heart upon my sleeve
For daws to peck at: I am not what I am.”

How Shakespeare uses it: Devious Iago basically says that if his outward appearance reflected what he was thinking, then his heart would be on his sleeve for birds to peck at — which is not a good idea in his eyes. And so he adds that he is actually not what he appears to be.

Notably, Iago’s motives for his antagonistic behavior are never fully revealed — so it is interesting that he is the character who has immortalized this phrase.

Modern definition: To show one’s feelings openly.

Source: “Othello,” Act 1, Scene 1

“Swagger”
“Swagger”
Wikimedia
Oberon, Titania, and Puck with dancing fairies.
“What hempen home-spuns have we swaggering here,
So near the cradle of the fairy queen?
What, a play toward! I’ll be the auditor;
An actor too, perhaps, if I see cause.”

How Shakespeare uses it: Puck, a mischievous sprite, uses the term “swagger” to mean “insolent.” It might have been a frequentative form of “swag,” which means “to sway.”

The word is also found in “Henry IV: Part 2” where Mistress Quickly gives a speech about super-aggressive men who visit her tavern, where the meaning of swagger suggests the meaning of boasting or bragging.

Additionally, the term is also found in “King Lear,” where it most closely means “blustering.” Although, here it is spelled “zwaggered.”

Modern definition: Jay Z used “swagger” and “swag” in several songs back in the early 2000s. Soulja Boy also used the word — “she likes my swag.” Since then, it has been often used in modern song lyrics.

Sources: “A Midsummer Night’s Dream,” Act 3, Scene 1, “Henry IV: Part 2,” Act 2, Scene 4, “King Lear, Act 4, Scene 6
“All of a sudden”
“All of a sudden”
Wikimedia
Katherina in “The Taming of the Shrew.”
“I pray, sir, tell me, is it possible
That love should of a sodaine take such hold?”

How Shakespeare uses it: Apparently, Shakespeare might have thought that “all of a sudden” was a more poetic way of saying “suddenly” so he had the character Tranio in “The Taming of the Shrew” say it that way.

Although, Shakespeare wasn’t the first to use “sudden” — John Greenwood used it in 1590.

Modern definition: The meaning is the same, although we now spell it “sudden” rather than “sodaine.” The word is spelled in the modern way in newer printings of “The Taming of the Shrew.”

Source: “The Taming of the Shrew,” Act 1, Scene 1

“A heart of gold”
“A heart of gold”
Wikimedia
Lewis Waller as Henry V.
“The king’s a bawcock, and a heart of gold,
A lad of life, an imp of fame;
Of parents good, of fist most valiant. …”

How Shakespeare uses it: King Henry disguises himself as a commoner in the play and asks Pistol, who is unaware of the disguise, whether he considers himself to be better than the king. Pistol responds with the above quote.

Modern definition: To be extremely kind and helpful.

Source: “Henry V,” Act 4, Scene 1
“One fell swoop”
“One fell swoop”
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Macduff.
“He has no children. All my pretty ones?
Did you say all? O hell-kite! All?
What, all my pretty chickens and their dam
At one fell swoop?”

How Shakespeare uses it: Macduff says this after finding out that his family and servants have been killed. Shakespeare’s use of the hunting bird’s’ “fell swoop” imagery reflects the ruthlessness and deadliness of the attack.

Modern definition: In one, sudden act.

Source: “Macbeth, Act 4, Scene 3

“Devil incarnate”
“Devil incarnate”
Wikimedia
“O worthy Goth, this is the incarnate devil
That robb’d Andronicus of his good hand.” (Titus Andronicus)

“Yes, that a’ did; and said they were devils incarnate.” (Henry V)

How Shakespeare uses it: Lucius calls Aaron the Moor the “devil incarnate” — aka a devil in the flesh — after all the suffering he causes his family. Chief among them, convincing Demtrius and Chiron to rape Lavinia and framing Martius and Quintus for the murder of Bassianus.

Shakespeare also reused the phrase about a decade later in “Henry V.”

Modern definition: The meaning of the phrase is more or less unchanged.

Sources: “Titus Andronicus,” Act V, Scene 1, “Henry V,” Act 2, Scene 3
“Stuff that dreams are made on/of”
“Stuff that dreams are made on/of”
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Prospero and Miranda.
“We are such stuff
As dreams are made on, and our little life
Is rounded with a sleep.”

How Shakespeare uses it: This phrase is not as cheerful as we use it today. Prospero is saying that peoples’ lives — and his magic — are like dreams: We experience them, and then they totally evaporate without leaving any lasting evidence. “Sleep” likely refers to death here.

Modern definition: Nowadays, we say “stuff that dreams are made of” rather than “on.” And it also refers to some sort of fantasy things or life that we could only dream of having.

Source: “The Tempest,” Act 4, Scene 1

“To come full circle”
“To come full circle”
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The wheel of fortune from Boccaccio.
“Thou hast spoken right, ’tis true;
The wheel has come full circle: I am here.”

How Shakespeare uses it: Edmund says the phrase at the end of “King Lear,” highlighting how he has “completed a cycle” where his diabolical actions have come back to haunt him.

Shakespeare was also probably referencing Fate — and the “Wheel of Fortune” — from ancient and medieval philosophy, which thus introduced the question of free will versus everything being determined by fate.

Modern definition: Completing a cycling, getting back to the beginning.

Source: “King Lear,” Act 5, Scene 3
“In my heart of heart”
“In my heart of heart”
AP
Lawrence Olivier as Hamlet
“Give me that man
That is not passion’s slave, and I will wear him
In my heart’s core, ay, in my heart of heart,
As I do thee.”

How Shakespeare uses it: While speaking with Horatio, Hamlet says this phrase noting that if there’s a man who is “not passion’s slave” — aka, a master of his emotions — then he’ll put him close to his heart. Using the language “heart’s core” right before suggests that Hamlet means some very deep, central part of his heart/emotions.

Modern definition: Nowadays, we pluralize the second “heart” to say “in my heart of hearts.” The phrase refers to one’s inner-most, secret thoughts.

Source: “Hamlet,” Act 3, Scene 2

“Too much of a good thing”
“Too much of a good thing”
Wikimedia
Rosalind dressed as a man, Ganymede.
“Why then, can one desire too much of a good thing?
Come, sister, you shall be the priest and marry us.
Give me your hand, Orlando. What do you say, sister?”

How Shakespeare uses it: This phrase may have been a proverb dating to the late 15th century, but Shakespeare was the one who has it immortalized in print.

Rosalind is pretending to be a man named Ganymede while she is with Orlando, with whom she is in love. He’s also in love with Rosalind — and doesn’t know she is Ganymede — and practices how he would woo Rosalind with Ganymede. At one point, Rosalind/Ganymede suggests that they have a pretend wedding, and asks if one can ever have too much of a good thing.

Modern definition: Too much good might backfire and be bad.

Source: “As You Like It,” Act 4, Scene 1
“All that glitters is not gold”
“All that glitters is not gold”
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Portia from “The Merchant of Venice.”
“All that glitters is not gold;
Often have you heard that told:
Many a man his life hath sold
But my outside to behold:
Gilded tombs do worms enfold.”

How Shakespeare uses it: Shakespeare seems to be the first person to have written this phrase, although the idea was not new.

The Prince of Morocco, one of Portia’s suitors in “The Merchant of Venice,” much choose out the correct casket to get his bride: one gold, one silver, and one lead. The gold one has an inscription on it which reads “All that glitters is not gold … gilded tombs do worms enfold.” But he picks it anyway …

Modern definition: Basically, just because it’s shiny and nice on the outside, doesn’t mean that that’s true of the inside.

Source: “The Merchant of Venice,” Act 2, Scene 7

Shakespeare died 400 years ago today — here are 21 everyday phrases he coined

 

The Rain and a Train

Got a few good ones on the way home this morning. We had been having rain since about sunrise and it was intense at first and then became a steady heavy drizzle.

The BNSF 5402 East was hauling ass through it as it headed for Barstow and a crew change for points east from Barstow.

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California City Boulevard from CA 58
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BNSF 5402 East through the highway spray

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A clearer view of BNSF 5402 East
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CA 58 looking toward the rain shrouded Tehachapi

It was definitely a wet morning!

As a Pilot sees the World

A friend of mine in Upstate New York emailed these pictures to me late yesterday. The views are incredible in some of the. My favorite is of Dubrovnik, Croatia.

Amsterdam
Amsterdam
Athens
Athens
Barcelona
Barcelona
Bern, Switzerland
Bern
Capetown
Capetown
Central Park, NYC
Central Park NYC
Chicago
Chicago
Dubai
Dubai
Dubrovnik
Dubrovnik, Croatia
Giza Pyramids, Egypt
Giza Pyramids, Egypt
Male, Maldives
Male, Maldives
Mangroves, New Caledonia
Mangroves in New Caledonia
Maze at Longleat, England
Maze at Longleat, England
Meskendir Valley, Turkey
Meskendir Valley, Turkey
Mexico City
Mexico City, DF
Moscow
Moscow
Namib Desert, Namibia
Namib Desert,, Namibia
Niagara Falls NY
Niagara Falls, NY
Paris
Paris
Shanghai
Shanghai
Tulip Fields, Netherlands
Tulip Fields, The Netherlands
Vancouver BC
Vancouver, BC
Venice
Venice

I have been to Barcelona three times while deployed aboard Independence. I have been through JFK at New York as a kid. I have been to Chicago on the ballast trains and Vancouver several times when I was at NAS Whidbey, Island WA.

Sunrise in the Antelope Valley

I had to take Missus ORPO to LAX to fly to Syracuse, NY to surprise Son Number 1 on his Fortieth Birthday. I was up at 0100 and we were on the road at 0200. I pulled up in front of American Airlines in about 0350 and I was headed home by 0415. I stopped for breakfast at Denney’s in Santa Claria for breakfast and Stater Bros in Mojave where I picked up a new IPA from Sierra Nevada.

Coming down the hill to Palmdale is a scenic pull out and the sky in the East was getting light so I decided to break out the Nikon.

Some are good and some are not. I am still trying to get it figured out.

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